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COLORADO STUDENTS ARE NAMED SEMIFINALISTS IN THE 5TH ANNUAL DISCOVERY CHANNEL YOUNG SCIENTIST CHALLENGE

Discovery Communications, Inc. has announced the names of 400 middle school students selected as semifinalists in the 2003 Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge. The nation's premier science contest for students in grades 5 - 8, the Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge (DCYSC) celebrates and encourages science excellence among America's youth, at an age when many begin to lose interest in the field.

Ten students from the state of Colorado were named DCYSC semifinalists.

Jake Harman, grade 6, of Boulder, CO, was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for his project entitled Predicting Viscosity Using Rotating Velocity. Jake took 2nd Place in Physics at CSEF.

Michaela Kaiser, grade 8, of Monte Vista, CO, was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for her project entitled, How Fast Is the Clock Ticking? Titer vs. Time. Michaela took 1st Place in Botany at CSEF.

Dailey Kluck, grade 6, of Boulder, CO, was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for his project entitled Windblocks. Dailey took 3rd Place in Earth & Space Sciences and CSEF.

Anita Lowe, grade 8, of Berthoud, CO, was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for her project entitled, The Effects of Pulsed DC Electricity on Pond Water Bacteria. Anita took 1st Place in Microbiology at CSEF.

Kathleen Luff, grade 8, of Colorado Springs, CO was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for her project entitled, The Rehabilitation of Burned Areas. Kathleen took 2nd Place in Environmental Sciences at CSEF.

Timothy Schneider, grade 7, of Durango, CO was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for his project entitled Can You Hear Me? Timothy took 1st Place in Engineering and was the 2nd Place All Fair winner at CSEF.

Lisa Truong, grade 8, of Grand Junction, CO, was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for her project entitled, How Do You Make an Electromagnet?

Michael Vaggalis, grade 6, of Conifer, CO was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for his project entitled Does the Density of Wood Affect How Much Weight Different Pieces of Wood Will Hold in Water?

Kassi Watson, grade 8, of Fort Morgan, CO, was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for her project entitled, A Walk Down Memory Lane.

Ashley Wilkinson, grade 7, of Colorado Springs, CO was selected by DCYSC judges as a semifinalist for her project entitled, Got Water? Ashley took 2nd Place in Botany at CSEF.

"At a time when science and technology play an increasingly critical role in all our daily lives, there is an urgency to ensure we are nurturing the next generation of young scientists," says Kyle O'Connor, DCYSC Program Director. "Discovery Channel's contest responds to this challenge by engaging middle school students and pushing the limits of innovation and creativity in science, as demonstrated by these 400 outstanding semifinalists."

The "Final Forty" will be selected from today's 400 semifinalists and advance to the DCYSC National Competition, October 19-22, in Washington, DC. The "Final Forty," who will be announced on September 17, will receive an all-expense-paid trip to the nation's capital, where they will compete for more than $100,000 worth of scholarships and special prizes as well as the title of "America's Top Young Scientist of the Year."

The DCYSC will test the "Final Forty" in a range of innovative and complex science challenges and will judge the students based on their science ability, leadership, teamwork and effective communication skills. The winners will be announced at the Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, October 22.

About the Semifinalists
The 400 students represent 45 states and the District of Columbia, with Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania topping the list of states with the most semifinalists. They range in age from 10 to 15 years, with a nearly even split between girls and boys - 196 females and 204 males. Students qualified for the DCYSC by winning or placing in their Science Service-affiliated state or regional science fair. DCYSC judges, who reviewed more than 1,950 entries, based their semifinalist selections on the quality of each student's original science project in addition to each student's ability to effectively communicate the science behind their work and their findings.

Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge Background
Created in 1999, Discovery designed the DCYSC to be a part of the solution to America's chronic underachievement in science and math. The contest responds to evidence that academic performance and interest in science among American students declines dramatically as students get older - particularly during the middle school years. The DCYSC identifies and honors America's top middle school student who demonstrates the best skills in leadership, teamwork, and scientific problem-solving. In addition, the ability to be an effective science communicator - a goal that reflects Discovery's philosophy that scientific knowledge is most valuable when communicated and shared - is a key component of the judging.

More than 7,500 middle school students have entered the DCYSC since its inception. Winners have received more than $400,000 in scholarship awards, federal government recognition, and have participated in science-related trips that have taken them to the far corners of the globe.

Discovery Communications, Inc. is the leading global real-world media and entertainment company. DCI has grown from its core property, the Discovery Channel, first launched in the United States in 1985, to current global operations in more than 155 countries and territories with over 950 million cumulative subscribers. DCI's 33 networks of distinctive programming represent 14 entertainment brands including TLC, Animal Planet, Travel Channel, Discovery Health Channel, Discovery Kids, Discovery Times Channel, The Science Channel, Discovery Wings Channel, Discovery Home & Leisure Channel, Discovery en Espanol, HD Theater and The Health Network. DCI's other properties consist of Discovery.com and 120 Discovery Channel retail stores. DCI also distributes BBC America in the United States. DCI's ownership consists of four shareholders: Liberty Media Corporation (NYSE: L), Cox Communications, Inc. (NYSE: COX), Advance/Newhouse Communications and John S. Hendricks, the Company's Founder, Chairman, and CEO.

Science Service administers the DCYSC. One of the most respected nonprofit organizations advancing the cause of science, Science Service has a sterling reputation for conducting high-quality competitions on the national and international level, including the Intel Science Talent Search and the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Science Service is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the understanding and appreciation of science among people of all ages through publications, outreach and science programs.

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Last modified 10/21/10