Colorado State Science Fair, Inc.


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2013 COLORADO SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FAIR

The 58th Colorado Science and Engineering Fair was held at Lory Student Center on the Colorado State University campus on April 11 - 13, 2013.

This year, CSEF winners were chosen from among 258 projects represented by 295 finalists from 113 schools and 13 regions within the state. More than 140 professional scientists, engineers and mathematicians interviewed the students and evaluated their projects before selecting the Grand Award winners. In addition, over 60 businesses, professional societies, and government agencies provided more than 150 of their own representatives to judge exhibits based on their own criteria. They judged the student finalists and conferred Special Awards which represented an aspect of the bestowing organization. These included college scholarships, offers of summer employment, field trips, cash, and savings bonds. Over 1,000 people attended the Awards Ceremony this year.

Scholarships from Adams State University, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, Colorado State University, Pueblo, and University of Colorado, Boulder were also presented. Adams State College awarded fourteen one-year full resident tuition and fees scholarships. The Colorado School of Mines awarded four $1,000 renewable tuition scholarships. Colorado State University awarded twelve $1,000 renewable tuition scholarships to each of the 1st place senior division category winners who were eligible. The College of Natural Sciences at CSU also awarded three $1,000 tuition scholarships to each of the Senior Division CSEF Best Project award winners. Colorado State University, Pueblo awarded two $1,000 tuition scholarships. The University of Colorado, Boulder awarded three $500 renewable scholarships and five $1,000 renewable scholarships. The Colorado Science and Engineering Fair also awarded a $2,000 scholarship to a twelfth grader in the name of Ryan Patterson (Intel ISEF top winner in 2001) for use at the college or university of their choice.

The 2013 Colorado Science and Engineering Fair had 20 sponsors. Sponsors included 2 Diamond Sponsors (providing over $10,000), 4 Platinum Sponsors (providing between $5,000 - $9,999), 5 Gold Sponsors (providing between $2,500 - $4,999), 2 Silver Sponsor (providing between $1,000 - $2,499), 2 Bronze Sponsors (providing between $750 - $999) and 6 Copper Sponsors (providing between $500 - $749). In addition, there were 15 Contributors (less than $500 each). Persons interested in supporting the CSEF financially should view the sponsorship/contributor guidelines.


This year, the CSEF was honored to have Brian Jones from Colorado State University's Little Shop of Physics as the guest speaker.

Science is, ultimately, a tool for understanding the world around us, for answering questions.  How can you tell, by listening to its growl, how large a dog is?  (You can, and so can other dogs.)  Why is the sky purple (it looks blue, but it's more violet) and why does this matter to bees?  In this talk, Brian Jones, the director of the Little Shop of Physics and a popular instructor in the Physics Department at CSU, will share some engaging demonstrations that help you discover new dimensions of sound and hearing, of light and vision, and new ways of looking at the world around you.

As the Director of the Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, Brian Jones has seen the program grow from a small, informal outreach program to a respected source of ideas and inspiration for teachers around the country.  Brian was recently awarded the Excellence in Science Instruction Award by the Colorado Association of Science Teachers for his work with schools, teachers and students around the state, and was one of 75 most influential physics educators of the past 75 years selected in a nationwide poll of readers of The Physics Teacher magazine.  In 2011, he was awarded the Millikan Medal by the American Association of Physics Teachers for creativity and excellence in physics education.

When he is not on the road with the LSOP, Brian has become a popular and effective classroom instructor.  He was recognized in 2000 by students at Colorado State with a "Best Teacher" award, and has also won awards from the College of Natural Sciences, Golden Key Honor Society, the Students as Leaders in Science, and other groups at Colorado State.  He is a co-author of one of the best-selling college physics textbooks nationwide.

In recent years, Brian has worked to join techniques of effective classroom instruction with ideas for developing hands-on experiments from the LSOP to develop workshops for teachers that join science content, effective pedagogy and tips and tricks for developing effective hands-on science activities for K-12 students.

The Little Shop of Physics is a hands-on science outreach program at Colorado State University.  They are a group of scientists and science educators who work together to develop engaging and effective tools for hands-on science instruction.  They don't show students science - they help them do science.  Each week, the LSOP van carries 100+ hands-on science stations and a crew of undergraduate student interns to a different school.  LSOP also has a local television program (Everyday Science) produced in cooperation with the local school district, they put on a big open house every year that draws 5,000 or more attendees, and they present workshops to teachers - over 300 each year.  You can learn more at their website, http://littleshop.physics.colostate.edu.


2013 COLORADO SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FAIR TOP AWARDS

The top three Senior Division project exhibitors (individual or team) win a trip to compete in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair held in Phoenix, AZ May 12 - 17, 2013. First place went to Cole Hugelmeyer, Boulder High School in Boulder, grade 12, for the project Discretization of Infinite Dimensional Geodesics. Second place went to Easton LaChappelle, Mancos High School in Mancos, grade 11, for the project Fine Motor Skills Using Neural Activated Biomechanical Prosthesis. Third place went to Logan Collins, Fairview High School in Boulder, grade 10, for the project Testing Artificial Genes Designed to Inhibit the Growth of E. coli As an Alternative to Traditional Antibiotics.

The winner of the Ralph F. Desch Memorial Technical Writing Award was Logan Collins from Fairview High School in Boulder, grade 10, for the project Testing Artificial Gene Design to Inhibit the Growth of E. cole As an Alternative to Traditional Antibiotics.

The winner of the Senior Division Student Choice Award was Lexi Thompson, Otis Jr/Sr High School in Otis, grade 12, for the project Creation of a Yield Probability Calculator. The Junior Division Student Choice winner was Alyssa Frager, The Classical Academy in Colorado Springs, grade 7, for the project It's a Kick.

The winner of the Poster Art Contest was Haley Ballard, Pueblo South High School in Pueblo.

The winners of the Pioneers of Science Awards were:
Sean Smith, Cherry Creek Challenge School in Denver, grade 8, for the project Seeing Sound: A Study of Cymatics in Two Dimensions;
Molly Nehring, Monte Vista Middle School in Monte Vista, grade 6, for the project Have You Been Mooned?;
Quinn Luthy, Miller Middle School in Durango, grade 7 for the project Plague, Inc.;
Danae Beauprez, Otis Elementary School in Otis, grade 6, for the project Wormy Maze;
Jamison White, Blevins Middle School in Fort Collins, grade 6, for the project Golf Ball vs. Mathematics;
Ben Bleichrodt, West Jefferson Middle School in Conifer, grade 6, for the project Don't Rock the Boat;
Jessalyn Bay-Voit, Mancos Middle School in Mancos, grade 8, for the project Bites?;
Cierra Ruybal, Pueblo School for Arts and Sciences in Pueblo, grade 7, for the project Bacteria Age Rage;
Talor Saffer, Arriba-Flagler School in Flagler, grade 8, for the project Too Much of a Good Thing? 2;
Sarah Wong, Banning Lewis Ranch Academy in Colorado Springs, grade 8, for the project Are You Smarter Than A 5th Grader?;
Loretta Avis, Trinidad Middle School in Trinidad, grade 7, for the project Do All Household Substances Form Crystals?;
Connor Voss, Beulah School of Natural Sciences in Beulah, grade 6, for the project Space vs. Sheep: Which is Warmer?;
Hayden Ballard, Beulah School of Natural Sciences in Beulah, grade 8, for the project Steel vs. Obsidian: Which Makes the Cut?;
Emily Nicol, Louisville Middle School in Louisville, grade 8, for the project Slurry Fury; and
Tate Hinger, Pagosa Springs Middle School in Pagosa Springs, grade 7, for the project Cheater, Cheater.

The winner of the CSEF Teacher of the Year Award was Candus Muir of The Classical Academy in Colorado Springs. Mrs. Muir received a $3,000 grant to use towards scientific research in her classroom and school. Mrs. Muir also received a scholarship to attend SparkFun's Summer Semester 5-day class ($500 value) from SparkFun Electronics.

The other nominees for the Teacher of the Year Award received a scholarship to attend a 2-day Microcontroller for Educators class ($250 value) from SparkFun Electronics. The nominees included Angela Golding from Edison High School in Yoder, Linda Niccoli from Fleming High School in Fleming, and Terri Paulson from Sargent Jr/Sr High School in Monte Vista.

The 1st and 2nd place Junior Division category winners were nominated for the Broadcom MASTERS middle school competition. This year, 10 Colorado students were named as Semi-Finalists and Rebecca Bloomfield & Johann Kailey-Steiner were chosen as Finalists to attend the Broadcom MASTERS competition in Washington, DC in October. Rebecca won a 2nd Place Technology Award of $2,500 and Johann won a 1st Place Mathematics Award of $3,500.

See the complete list of CSEF Grand Award winners, Special Award winners, and Scholarship winners or print an official 2013 Press Release.

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Last modified 6/4/14